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  #1  
Old 06-18-2017, 10:33 AM
HPF Bob HPF Bob is offline
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Default My Official Apology...

...for thinking Colin Kaepernick could somehow fit in with the Texans.

https://www.outkickthecoverage.com/c...lave-catchers/

He's dead meat now. Not the sort of stuff you should tweet while you're looking for a scarce NFL job. Good luck in Canada...
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  #2  
Old 06-18-2017, 11:22 AM
barrett barrett is offline
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I don't see any reason to apologize.

This is no different than the pig police socks he was wearing last year before he ever started his protest. The young man doesn't like cops. Maybe an individual cop gave him reason not to. Maybe he just likes causes. Either way he clearly decided somewhere along the line that all cops are bad. Nothing about that is new or surprising.

There is also nothing about his feelings that affects his ability (or inability in his case) to play QB. I'd have a real problem if we employed women beaters, but I am ok with guys in Texans uniforms who disagree with me out loud (especially when half the league probably agrees with him in private).
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  #3  
Old 06-18-2017, 02:48 PM
chuck chuck is offline
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The police in the country where you people live are militarized and out of control. As I've mentioned before, that is one very real reason why I do not live there. Good luck getting the genie back in the bottle on that one.

Clay Travis is a racist shitstain. It is unsurprising in the extreme that someone like Buford would thrill to his idiotic site.
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  #4  
Old 06-19-2017, 05:58 AM
HPF Bob HPF Bob is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chuck View Post
The police in the country where you people live...
My, that sounds elitist. You could never pay me enough to do their jobs. I haven't always been pleased with my interractions with police but I respect that they are often thrust into difficult situations where they must make split-second decisions and there is a media culture right there to second-guess their every decision.

Yes, there are some dirty cops out there who mistreat people for no reason but any profession (say, NFL quarterback) has a few people with way too high an opinion of themselves.

I like what one of my co-workers (who is an ardent cop-hater) offers as a solution. For every monetary judgement in a case where deadly force was used, take the settlement money out of the police union's pension, rather than the city/state's coffers. Then, he opines, the good cops will be less inclined to protect the bad ones and the force will weed out the bad ones on their own.

Meanwhile, enjoy the police in La Shitholia. I'm sure they are that nation's finest.
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  #5  
Old 06-19-2017, 11:58 AM
Nconroe Nconroe is offline
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I think we should be able to have an opinion , of course not all agree.

I have several police as friends. Some of their police friends probably shouldn't be police.

Sad we can't all fully trust all police.
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  #6  
Old 06-19-2017, 01:13 PM
chuck chuck is offline
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Elitist? All of you live in the United States and I don't. To me it sounds factual.

I'm actually not all that bothered that the police almost always protect their own. It's a job that doesn't pay very well, and you have to put up with who knows what sort of abuse from all sorts of lowlifes. And of course it can be extremely dangerous. So it makes sense that they form a protective fraternity the way they seem to. What bothers me is that legally police officers are able to murder citizens in cold blood and almost invariably walk away from it with no punishment other than occasionally losing their job. That to me is completely insane. But, again, I recognize that there's nothing I can do about it and rather than sweat out every traffic stop wondering whether this flat topped redneck will have had one Red Bull too many I just got tf out of there and will let you guys sort it out.

I have interactions with the police here far more than I ever would in the US. For one thing, they often set up checkpoints in my neighborhood in the city. I would say that maybe once in every ten passes they'll ask me to produce my license. Otherwise they just waive me through. There are plenty of foot patrols around here, too. And there are lots of traffic police on the highway. They occasionally jump out and waive me over and accuse me of speeding. Sometimes I was, sometimes I wasn't. If I was I laugh with them and most of the time they let me go. If I wasn't I usually jump out and start yelling at them and usually we end up laughing and they let me go. The point is, I have never, ever wondered if a police officer here was going to decide he needed (or wanted) to shoot me. In the US I have that possibility in the back of my mind during every encounter. And let's just say that I don't exactly have a "wide-set nose."

The above is of course purely anecdotal, but in ten years here I know of a single case of an innocent citizen being shot by the police. The car they were in matched the car of a group of bad guys and some police officer reacted in a regrettable way and bad things happened. In the US virtually every day there is a new example of an officer shooting an unarmed suspect, a suspect who was fleeing on foot, a child, an unarmed child, etc. It is an epidemic and it is a disgrace to the society that anyone who is actively working to curb this violence is widely decried as some sort of modern day afro-radical or, worse, a social justice warrior.

Finally - and I'm not going to spend much time on this - but if you really think that the place where my family and I live is some sort of shithole, well, as usual, you could not be more mistaken.
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  #7  
Old 06-19-2017, 06:04 PM
barrett barrett is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chuck View Post
It is an epidemic and it is a disgrace to the society that anyone who is actively working to curb this violence is widely decried as some sort of modern day afro-radical or, worse, a social justice warrior.
Serious question. Is this a reference to Kaepernick.
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  #8  
Old 06-19-2017, 06:51 PM
chuck chuck is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by barrett View Post
Serious question. Is this a reference to Kaepernick.
No, I did not have him in mind when I referenced either group. I basically agree with him, but to me he is a bit of a distraction because conversation that begins with him and his acts of protest invariably return to him rather than focus on the actual issue that is of concern to me. You'll notice I have avoided discussing him in this thread, mainly for that very reason.

Why?
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